Only 5% of FT 100 company boards have a board director with specialist technology or cyber security experience, according to research by Deloitte.

Only 5% of FT 100 company boards have a board director with specialist technology or cyber security experience, according to research by Deloitte.This is despite cyber risk being identified as a principal risk by the vast majority of them. Of the type of cyber attacks disclosed as a threat, unauthorised access to systems ranked most common (19%), followed by hacking (13%) and malware (13%). Distributed denial of service (DDoS) attacks were only mentioned by five companies, despite Deloitte predictions that we could see ten million DDoS incidents in 2017.

More than half of companies mentioned cyber contingency, crisis management or disaster recovery plans in their annual report. Of these, however, only 58% disclosed that these plans had been simulated in test scenarios over the year.

The most commonly disclosed potential impacts of cyber breaches were business disruption (68%), reputational damage (58%), and data loss (45%).

Clearly, the more frequently and stringently mitigation plans are tested, the more resilient and responsive the company. Interestingly, very few reports identified employee action as one of their cyber security threats. Company employees are, knowingly or unintentionally, the most common cause of a cyber breach.

Deloitte’s analysis proposes seven principles to improve cyber disclosure when finalising reporting:

  • Every sector, although not every company, identifies cyber as a principal risk – think carefully if you have not done so.
  • The value destruction capability of cyber risk is very high, ranging from remediation demands to huge reputational damage. Detailed disclosure is therefore worthwhile to highlight the risks to shareholders and let them know you are taking it seriously.
  • The better disclosures are company specific, year specific and provide sufficient detail to give meaningful information to investors and other stakeholders.
  • Boards and board committees are increasingly educating themselves about the cyber threat and challenging management on how they are dealing with the risk.
  • Companies should take credit for what they are doing, including describing who has executive responsibility, board level responsibilities, the policy framework, internal controls, and disaster recovery plans.
  • Boards should think about what could be missing from their disclosures, for example a clear indication of the main threats facing the company, who poses those threats, the likelihood, possible impact and detail about what the company – and the board – is doing to manage or mitigate those particular risks.
  • Finally, if your disclosure does not look strong enough after taking credit for what the company is doing already, it is time to ask whether you are actually doing enough to manage cyber risk.

The report can be found at: https://www2.deloitte.com/uk/en/pages/press-releases/articles/just-5-of-ftse-100-companies-disclose.html

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